Selected Works

Husband and Wife on Sunday Morning, Fort Scott, Kansas, 1949 by Gordon Parks © The Gordon Parks Foundation

Description

NEW YORK, NY - In honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Gordon Parks, widely recognized as the most influential African American photographer of the 20th century, Howard Greenberg Gallery in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation will present two simultaneous exhibitions of his work.

Contact: Gordon Parks, Ralph Ellison, and “Invisible Man,” curated by Glenn Ligon, and Gordon Parks: Centennial will be on view from SEPTEMBER 14 – OCTOBER 27, 2012.

Parks, a remarkable Renaissance man who was also a writer, filmmaker, and composer, brought poetic style to street photography and portraiture, while exploring the social and economic impact of racism. Most noteworthy in the exhibitions will be a number of color prints from Segregation Story, 1956, a limited edition portfolio with an essay by Maurice Berger. On exhibition for the first time, they were produced in 2012 from a group of transparencies only recently discovered in a storage box at the Gordon Parks Foundation.

Contact: Gordon Parks, Ralph Ellison, and “Invisible Man,” curated by the artist Glenn Ligon, examines a series of works by Gordon Parks entitled Invisible Man. Many were first published in Life magazine upon the release of Ralph Ellison's award winning novel, which explored racial and social issues facing African Americans in the 20th century. A milestone in American literature, the novel is narrated by a black man who feels socially invisible. The exhibition includes the gelatin silver print The Invisible Man, Harlem, New York, 1952, a striking image of a man peering out from underneath a manhole cover in the middle of a deserted street. As Ligon notes, “The photos for Invisible Man veered back and forth between an attempt to illustrate some of the feverish scenes in the novel and the “reality” of Harlem, which Parks had tried to document in his previous work. Indeed, many of the photos in the exhibition were seemingly created in relationship to Parks’ photo assignments in Harlem, not as illustrations for the novel, although it is hard to distinguish between the two. It is the tension between these motives—to illustrate a fiction and to document a reality—that is the basis of this exhibition.”

Press Release

NEW YORK, NY - In honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Gordon Parks, widely recognized as the most influential African American photographer of the 20th century, Howard Greenberg Gallery in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation will present two simultaneous exhibitions of his work.

Contact: Gordon Parks, Ralph Ellison, and “Invisible Man,” curated by Glenn Ligon, and Gordon Parks: Centennial will be on view from SEPTEMBER 14 – OCTOBER 27, 2012.

 

Parks, a remarkable Renaissance man who was also a writer, filmmaker, and composer, brought poetic style to street photography and portraiture, while exploring the social and economic impact of racism. Most noteworthy in the exhibitions will be a number of color prints from Segregation Story, 1956, a limited edition portfolio with an essay by Maurice Berger. On exhibition for the first time, they were produced in 2012 from a group of transparencies only recently discovered in a storage box at the Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

Contact: Gordon Parks, Ralph Ellison, and “Invisible Man,” curated by the artist Glenn Ligon, examines a series of works by Gordon Parks entitled Invisible Man. Many were first published in Life magazine upon the release of Ralph Ellison's award winning novel, which explored racial and social issues facing African Americans in the 20th century. A milestone in American literature, the novel is narrated by a black man who feels socially invisible. The exhibition includes the gelatin silver print The Invisible Man, Harlem, New York, 1952, a striking image of a man peering out from underneath a manhole cover in the middle of a deserted street. As Ligon notes, “The photos for Invisible Man veered back and forth between an attempt to illustrate some of the feverish scenes in the novel and the “reality” of Harlem, which Parks had tried to document in his previous work. Indeed, many of the photos in the exhibition were seemingly created in relationship to Parks’ photo assignments in Harlem, not as illustrations for the novel, although it is hard to distinguish between the two. It is the tension between these motives—to illustrate a fiction and to document a reality—that is the basis of this exhibition.”

Art News September 2012

The Howard Greenberg Gallery

Howard Greenberg and guest

Marisa Cardinale, Mario and Adrienne Sprouse

Oscar Tang and Peter Kunhardt

Glenn Ligon

Leslie Parks and Emanuel Leroy

Cissy Viebranz, Peter Kunhardt, Curt Viebranz, and Suzy Kunhardt

Thelma Golden and Duro Olowu

Johanna Fiore and Howard Greenberg

Charles Revson, Keiren and Thomas Schwarz

Eddie and Sallie Stern, Suzy Kunhardt, Peggy Rice, and Peter Kunhardt

Karen Marks

Hank Thomas, Deborah Willis

Mai Morson and Maurice DuBois

Ralph Gardner, Peter Kunhardt, and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

 Mario Sprouse, and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Peter Kunhardt Jr., Sarah Arison, and Diana Revson

Thelma Golden, Duro Olowu, and Marisa Cardinale

Mario Sprouse and Dr. Adrienne Sprouse

Karen Marks

Jackie Phillips, George Kunhardt, Lewis Hart III, and Teddy Kunhardt

Howard Greenberg, Glenn Ligon, and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Maurice DuBois

Peter Kunhardt, Matt Goldman, and guest

Dionne Thornton

Glenn Ligon and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Howard Greenberg and guest

Jon and Wendy Smith

Charles Revson and Georgette Mallory

Howard Greenberg, Leslie Parks, and Mai Morson

Peter MacGill and guest

Karen Marks and guest

Thelma Golden, Allison Levy, and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Gene Young and Diana Revson

Diana Revson and Marcus Samuelsson

Elizabeth Kneiling

Peter Kunhardt and guests

Howard Greenberg and guest

Heidi Leiser and daughter

Philip Kunhardt III and guest

Diana Revson and Marisa Cardinale

Diane Marshall, Jean Denoyer, and Diana Revson

Howard Greenberg and guest

Johanna Fiore and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Howard Greenberg, Leslie Parks, Thelma Golden, and Duro Olowu

Wendy Goodman, Elizabeth Kneiling, Tripp Revson, and Diana Revson

Diana Revson, Abbie Wyman, and Bob Hiemstra

Marcus Samuelsson and Howard Greenberg

Delia Roche-Kelly, Belle McIntyre and guest

Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Zoltan Kovacs

Sarah Friedman and guest

Victoria Leeds and Peter Kunhardt Jr.

Peter Kunhardt Jr. and Vince Aletti

Glenn Ligon curates exhibition at the Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York